Roaring Wildfires Make San Fransisco Sky Look Like Mars

San Francisco Chronicle - Jessica Christian and Scott Strazzante / Facebook

On September 9th, 2020, California and Oregon residents woke up to strange colors in the sky. An orange, cloudly atmosphere filled the sky and looked like something out of a Mars movie.

“It feels eerie, apocalyptic and frightening. I’ve lived in the Bay Area since 1988 and never experienced such doom coming from the sky,” McKeown told CNN.

The smoke from countless wildfires mixed with clouds and fog to tint the San Francisco sky a dark burnt orange. Some…

Posted by San Francisco Chronicle on Wednesday, September 9, 2020

The beautiful blue morning skyline was replaced by a spooky red-yellow smoky sky and traffic and weather cameras captured multiple different angles of it in the Bay Area.

“When the smoke and ash get even thicker close to the wildfires, it can cut the sunlight out completely, making it look like the dead of night,” CNN meteorologist Judson Jones said.

The reason the phenomenon is happening is because of wildfires have been burning non-stop through California, Washington, and Oregon. Millions of acres have been destroyed and thousands of people have lost their homes and businesses. The wildfires have reduced to the air quality which has not been particularly good for children and elderly people.

Posted by The Juice Media on Wednesday, September 9, 2020

Erin DeMerritt, Bay Area Air Quality Management District spokeswoman told CNN that giant smoke clouds caused 25 straight days of “Spare the Air” alerts, the worst unhealthy air quality alerts on record in the Bay Area.

Whether it be in the San Francisco Bay Area or in the Salem, Oregon area, residents are experiencing the same apocalyptic view. Some said it was like a long solar eclipse, while others saw it as a start of the apocalypse.

“The smoke and ash are acting like nature’s version of an Instagram filter. The particles in the air are refracting sunlight similar to the way small air particles do when the sun sets or rises,” CNN meteorologist Judson Jones stated.