The Fate Of PBR Finally Revealed – And I’m Crying

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One of the most-classic beers in the nation, Pabst Blue Ribbion has become a cultural icon and a staple at bars everywhere – especially in recent years. But, facing doom recently, PBR had its back to the wall and folks everywhere were freaking out at the thought of losing their favorite beer.

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From its peak in 1977 producing more than 18 million barrels to the sharp decline of the company that put it around 1 million barrels in 2001, PBR has fought for its life more than once…but this may be the end-all to the best-loved redneck beer in America.

The American-style lager and its rich history in our culture might just be a memory to look back on in just a few, short years. PBR, who once owned their own production and bottling facility in Milwaukee, now has to rely on another producer and their facilities to craft their brew.

While PBR isn’t at its all-time low level of one million barrels (thanks, in large part to hipsters fueling sales) is still nowhere near its peak of 18 million barrels. Today, the famous beer brand sits at roughly 4 million barrels – and is steadily growing. But it has to bank on a beer producer to keep growing – and there’s only one large enough to handle the demand.

In lawsuit that went into jury deliberations earlier today – reported by multiple outlets including DelishMaxim, and Time – Pabst Blue Ribbon accused its producer MillerCoors LLC of intentionally sabotaging their brand.

MillerCoors LLC is the brewer, owner, and distributor of brands like Miller, Coors, Keystone, Blue Moon, and many others.

PBR alleged in their lawsuit that MillerCoors tried to put them out of business by denying them the brewing capacity and lying about their real abilities to produce enough barrels. PBR requires 4-4.5 million barrels annually to be produced by MillerCoors and, the company stated, they are entirely dependent on MillerCoors as “it has no real alternatives” for production partners.

The deal, which was inked at PBR’s lowest point in 2001, is scheduled to end in 2020, but has stipulations for two five-year extensions but must be agreed upon by both parties.

MillerCoors claimed that they didn’t have the means to continue pumping out PBR at levels that the company needed and followed that up by saying that PBR wasn’t coughing up enough cash for them to make room.

Well, PBR fired back with a $400 million lawsuit for damages and breach of contract…and that’s where we sit today. As of this morning, many of us were biting our nails and sitting at the edge of our seats awaiting the verdict from the jury to see if they would compel MillerCoors to honor the original agreement.

The jury left the courtroom for deliberations after hearing closing arguments and not too long after, shockingly, the judge was back in the courtroom hearing new statements from both parties.

According to a report from the Journal Sentinel, both PBR and MillerCoors had contacted the judge to put an end to the case – and finally seal PBR’s fate. 

“The parties have amicably resolved all outstanding issues in the case,” MillerCoors spokesman Peter Marino stated.

Pabst’s team basically said the same thing, adding a little bit more detail.

“The parties have amicably resolved all outstanding issues in the case. Pabst will continue to offer Pabst Blue Ribbon and the rest of our authentic, great tasting and affordable brews to all Americans for many, many years to come,” Pabst’s spokesman said.

For many across America – their prayers have been answers and Christmas has come early! The lifeblood of rednecks and hipsters alike continues to charge forward and build its decades-long legacy!

LONG LIVE PABST!

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